Royal Enfield Bullet 500es Classic Motorcycles Reviews (2)
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2011-02-23 2008 Royal Enfield Bullet 500es Classic Motorcycles View Listings

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I bought my Enfield in the fall of '08 and I love it. It puts a smile on my face every ride (and even seeing it in the garage). Take care in the break in process and you can feel the motor build power at 800 miles and 1,200 miles. With the mods, I can easily cruise at 65 and easily run up to 70 (much faster requires a cafe' head down position). I can easily stay neck to neck with my buddies HD from 0-60 mph. (after that, he quickly pulls away). It's by no means a fast bike, but that's not what this bike is about. In stock gearing this bike has a lot of torque, so a taller gearing is not a problem. It feels good on a mountain road and people cross the street to check it out and ask questions (passing up my friend's HD Springer anniversary addition - he's a good sport). I have had to update to a heavy duty starter relay. Also, much like an older bike, this bike does not start well in the cold - it does have a kick start though. This bike does require some attention, but had been very reliable - if you are even slightly mechanical and enjoy working on old cars or bikes (I came from a classic car background) a little tinkering and a fun classic ride - you can't beat it. p.s. An Enfield is made to be customized - take a look at all the aftermarket parts - you can make anything ... to make it yours.
- Rob C, Shelby, North Carolina

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2009-03-25 2007 Royal Enfield Bullet 500es Classic Motorcycles View Listings

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I purchased a new 2007 Bullet Classic (black) in Sept. 2008 and could not be happier with it. This is my first bike. It's a blast to ride, easy (and cheap!) to maintain, and a real conversation starter. It gets about 55 mpg in the city and 70 mpg on the parkways. The styling and finish quality make this bike an instant head turner. Every time I ride, several people will ask questions or compliment the restoration. In fact, I'm getting tired of explaining that it's a new 1955 machine. And the sound -- the music that emanates from that shorty English exhaust -- is just beautiful! This bike is a solid and dependable runner that has no problems handling the rough streets of NYC and the moonlike surface of the BQE. It was not difficult to adhere to the break-in procedure (a must!) because the traffic here is slow. The drum brakes are strong and well up to the demands of urban and highway riding. The suspension is rather stiff. that's good for handling but not always great for comfort. Harsh surfaces can give a harsh ride. So I'm thinking about the aftermarket Hagon shocks. Otherwise, the ergonomics and neutral riding position are roomy enough for a tall guy like me, though the stock seat has a step in the base pan that hits my tailbone sometimes. I'm getting a sprung solo saddle. At first the bike seemed not to have much power at higher speeds. However, now that it is mostly broken in, it has loosened up a lot and has proven to have plenty of grunt. The English-made freeflow exhaust definitely helps there (I had my dealer install it and re-jet the carb accordingly before I picked it up). A 130-mile trip on the Merritt Parkway was no problem as this bike ran consistently with the cars between 55-65 mph, up long hills and such (and got 70 mpg doing so). This bike requires only a little more maintenance than a modern bike. You have to check the valves once in a while, though mine have not yet needed adjustment. As with any bike, you also have to check oil and fluid levels (I top them off about every 200 miles), as well as the primary and drive chain tension (I adjusted each of them once, mostly for the practice). The most involved thing I've done so far was the drive chain adjustment, which you do by moving the rear wheel with the help of two snail cams. Getting the right tension while maintaining alignment was a little complicated, but I did it, and it shouldn't need another adjustment for several thousand miles. My dealer had to re-torque the head bolts during the break-in service, which I know how to do now if it's needed again. The importer's forum and the Pete Snidal repair manual are invaluable resources. This is the bike for you if you're looking for a gorgeous, vintage motorcycle for relaxed riding, commuting and tinkering. While it's a rugged and dependable bike, it's not designed for the freeway (i.e. sustained speeds of 70+ mph) and should not be ridden that way. Please note: you need a DIY attitude if you are serious about owning one of these bikes. It's easy and rewarding to do, but you have to be actively involved in your bike's upkeep or you will eventually regret it. You can't just use it; you have to form a relationship with it. Riding this bike is more about the journey than the destination.<br />
- Jeff Drouin, Brooklyn, New York

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